Smoking, vaping and tobacco

You can quit!

If you have been thinking about quitting tobacco, Welia Health is here to help. Studies show that at least three visits with a healthcare professional can bring the best results. Welia’s Certified Tobacco Treatment Therapist is trained to help you quit smoking or chewing tobacco. The program includes:

  • A personalized plan
  • Research-based tips and advice
  • Ongoing support
  • Incentives to those who follow through with our recommendations and program

Why quit?

According to the American Cancer Society, when smokers quit, benefits begin almost immediately and continue over time.

What happens beginning the moment you smoke your last cigarette.

Smoking and pregnancy

If you are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant, quitting smoking will significantly help prevent:

  • Low birth weight of your baby
  • Birth defects
  • Brain development issues
  • Still birth
  • Miscarriage
  • Lifelong learning problems

Cigarettes increase carbon monoxide to the fetus which then causes decreased oxygen to the growing baby. Explore more online resources about quitting smoking during pregnancy.

Once you’ve decided to quit, what’s next?

  1. At your first visit, you and the tobacco treatment specialist will design your quit plan. You will earn your first token for taking the first step toward quitting.
  2. At your follow-up visit, an assessment will be done about your progress and you will earn a second token.
  3. At your final visit, a follow-up will be done about your progress, you’ll receive any needed support and an additional token.

This program is offered at all of our locations – Mora, Hinckley and Pine City. Call 320.225.3356 with questions or to get started with our Certified Tobacco Cessation Therapist, Aaron Korte, RN.

References

  • Effect of Smoking on Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Pressure Amplification, Mahmud A, Feely J. Hypertension. 2003:41:183.
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202.
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 193, 194, 196, 285, 323.
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304.
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010, p. 359.
  • A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk after Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007 p. 341.
  • A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 155, 165.
  • Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk after Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007. p. 11.